Pratically Speaking…

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I remember taking home economics for two years in high school. I didn’t want to take it, mind you. I could cook, embroider, crochet….what more did I need My mom, wise woman that she was, insisted that I take home economics to really learn to sew. Sure, she admitted, she could teach me, but I needed someone who would make me do it and hold me accountable for finishing projects, namely, a teacher who would grade my work. Being obsessed with getting straight As that meant I had to work hard and learn the fine art of tailoring.

Aside from the sewing, however, I learned a lot about weights and measures. You know, things like how many cups are in a quart, quarts in a gallon, tablespoons in a cup, teaspoons in a tablespoon, etc, etc. By the time I graduated I knew these by heart and I’ve never forgotten them.

Husbands and kids are another story when it comes to understanding measurements. No matter how many times I told them there were 4 cups in a quart they could not remember it. And so it went, they asked and I explained, and explained and they asked and I explained. On and on. Until one day…

I found the pattern below by Stoney Creek. I grabbed that pattern off the shelf along with the frame and fabric and got to work post haste. It has hung in my kitchen ever since. Now when my family needs to know how many tablespoons are in a cup all they have to do is look at the wall and there it is. Problem solved.

The kids have moved out but my husband still uses that chart all the time. We are both glad I made it. It’s one of the most practical projects I’ve done.

 Homely Measures

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2 thoughts on “Pratically Speaking…

  1. Good work – the best projects are both practical and pretty, which means they can be useful for years. By the way, I’m increasingly more enamoured with US measurements for cooking, with cups instead of weight. My scales rarely get used now when I bake!

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